Tamriel Foundry

Storage in TESO

I see that there is a topic about housing in TESO but I have not seen a topic about storage (there may be such, and if there is please accept my apology for duplicating the topic).

To my mind the most important item in my house in Skyrim was my chest.  And the most important attribute of the chest was that its storage capacity was limitless.  I do not know what form storage will take in TESO and I am not particularly interested in what form the storage takes, an account in a bank, a chest in a house etc.  The most important issue for me is that the storage capacity should be enormous if not limitless.  I like to collect and keep lots of stuff and I can see no reason why the devs would want to limit the amount of stuff we can store.

Does anyone else have strong views on this topic?

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37 Replies
  1. #21

    aamouts

    Member109 Posts

    I find it difficult to accept that the devs would find it technically difficult to provide each character with a large amount (say 1,000 items) of static storage in one location (bank account, chest, whatever).  I accept that the devs may have other (non technical) reasons for limiting static storage.

    I'm not particularly concerned about how much stuff a character can carry.

  2. #22

    Nybling

    Contributor2079 Posts

    Why do you find it difficult to accept?  Let's say that ESO has 500,000 different items (gear pieces, crafting materials, vendor trash, etc...) in it's database.  Let's say each item has it's own unique ID.  So item A001001 is a low level helmet that looks cool.  In the back-end of things, this would be stored on characters as something like INVENTORY = A001001 (1), or something like that.  I'm just trying to kep things simple here.

    Now let's say that there are 1,500,000 unique characters in ESO.  Not a hard number as games seem to announce their 1,000,000th character rather quickly after launch.  Let's say that each character has a base inventory of 40 items, and a maximum bank of 200 slots.

    That's saying that there would be 60,000,000 database entries for character inventory at the maximum, and 300,000,000 database entries for bank storage.  It's very likely that they will have things set up in such a way that it won't take up anywhere near that many entries, but I think my point stands.  In Skyrim, a single-player game, it's very easy to let players put as much crap as they want to wherever they want to, because that data is stored locally.

    In ESO, the data is stored on their servers, and each time you add or remove inventory/bank items it's pinging the server.  They want to keep things at a reasonable level for their end, and they don't want to have a metric fuckton of DB entries because they are allowing people to have thousands of items in storage.

  3. #23

    Scootter

    Member216 Posts

    @Nybling We probably all underestimate database and server capabilites these days but you are correct, that would be a ton of data traffic.

    @Killsquad and @aamouts I do think there will be some initial limit for sure but who knows how much we can expand upon it.

    I wouldn't mind having a separate trophy/treasure type of storage that you could put some of the stuff you really like but it isn't quite usable anymore.  I don't know, it will be interesting.

  4. #24

    Byronyk

    Member421 Posts

    @BroScottcho As a sql server data WH analyst, I disagree. Nybling is right on the money in his example. You will never see item data stored locally either because there is a chance of item dups and/or exploitation which leaves item data being stored server side. To store the entire population of ESO and their hoarding habbits would require unnecessary expenses in data warehousing, but would also contribute to server instability.

    Even if the developers bought extra servers to manage limitless item data, I would much rather see that money put towards game development in far more critical areas (mid-end game, PvP, expansions, etc).

  5. #25

    Scootter

    Member216 Posts

    @Byronyk You disagree with what exactly?  I agreed with @Nybling , for once! :)

     

  6. #26

    Byronyk

    Member421 Posts

    You changed your original post before I posted mine on the topic of underestimating their server capacity. I don't think we're underestimating at all, just being realistic.

  7. #27

    Byronyk

    Member421 Posts

    In the most recent Bethesda podcast, the devs just answered this question. ESO will have slots (bags) for inventory which will have detailed filter options. Storage will not be limitless or based on stamina.

    Source

  8. #28

    Kavist

    Member50 Posts
    Nybling wrote on January 22, 2013

    Why do you find it difficult to accept?  Let’s say that ESO has 500,000 different items (gear pieces, crafting materials, vendor trash, etc…) in it’s database.  Let’s say each item has it’s own unique ID.  So item A001001 is a low level helmet that looks cool.  In the back-end of things, this would be stored on characters as something like INVENTORY = A001001 (1), or something like that.  I’m just trying to kep things simple here.

    Now let’s say that there are 1,500,000 unique characters in ESO.  Not a hard number as games seem to announce their 1,000,000th character rather quickly after launch.  Let’s say that each character has a base inventory of 40 items, and a maximum bank of 200 slots.

    That’s saying that there would be 60,000,000 database entries for character inventory at the maximum, and 300,000,000 database entries for bank storage.  It’s very likely that they will have things set up in such a way that it won’t take up anywhere near that many entries, but I think my point stands.  In Skyrim, a single-player game, it’s very easy to let players put as much crap as they want to wherever they want to, because that data is stored locally.

    In ESO, the data is stored on their servers, and each time you add or remove inventory/bank items it’s pinging the server.  They want to keep things at a reasonable level for their end, and they don’t want to have a metric fuckton of DB entries because they are allowing people to have thousands of items in storage.

    That math is incredible <.<

    Saying that, i can agree with him based on my generally low knowledge of server things.  It would make a lot more sense to have a *relatively* low inventory maximum for each player

  9. #29

    Lordshayne

    Member1636 Posts
    Nybling wrote on January 22, 2013

    Why do you find it difficult to accept?  Let’s say that ESO has 500,000 different items (gear pieces, crafting materials, vendor trash, etc…) in it’s database.  Let’s say each item has it’s own unique ID.  So item A001001 is a low level helmet that looks cool.  In the back-end of things, this would be stored on characters as something like INVENTORY = A001001 (1), or something like that.  I’m just trying to kep things simple here.

    Now let’s say that there are 1,500,000 unique characters in ESO.  Not a hard number as games seem to announce their 1,000,000th character rather quickly after launch.  Let’s say that each character has a base inventory of 40 items, and a maximum bank of 200 slots.

    That’s saying that there would be 60,000,000 database entries for character inventory at the maximum, and 300,000,000 database entries for bank storage.  It’s very likely that they will have things set up in such a way that it won’t take up anywhere near that many entries, but I think my point stands.  In Skyrim, a single-player game, it’s very easy to let players put as much crap as they want to wherever they want to, because that data is stored locally.

    In ESO, the data is stored on their servers, and each time you add or remove inventory/bank items it’s pinging the server.  They want to keep things at a reasonable level for their end, and they don’t want to have a metric fuckton of DB entries because they are allowing people to have thousands of items in storage.

    But you want to make sure that players can collect loot from raids and not have to visit the bank every 5 minutes to store it all. They shouldn't make it a low inventory space, but rather an average size.

     

    I've seen a few games where the inventory can only hold 15 items. This makes it hard to raid multiple dungeons without being forced to spend an extra 15 minutes to drop off your items and then raid again for more loot.

     

    However, let's not leave math to me. Especially on this field.

  10. #30

    Dezman

    Member73 Posts

    Thanks for clearing it up byr

  11. #31

    Fateweaver

    Member52 Posts

    I agree that there needs to be large amounts of storage. I would like to see a system kinda like wow has, where your bank has X slots, and you can add bags to increase the size. But as for personal carry space, are we going to be restricted to '25 item slots' where a plate chest takes up the same space as a dagger, or are we going to be restricted by a weight limit like in all other TES games?

    I look threw my scope and see many faces. Some are new, some are old, one is yours. Your fate is in my hands, mine to weave as i see fit.

  12. #32

    Garlyn

    Member70 Posts

    I know I'm going to be shot for this, but...

    Guild Wars 2 had one of the best storage systems ever. :[

    Just another fellow traversing the path of uncertainty and endeavor.
  13. #33

    XxOblivion

    Member87 Posts

    If everyone had a house there would be subdivisions in TESO

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  14. #34

    dhodgs

    Member93 Posts
    XxOblivion wrote on February 4, 2013

    If everyone had a house there would be subdivisions in TESO

    we could have block parties and bbq's, but only if we had unlimited storage space to house all the horker meat that we'd need for the cookouts, and pies for the pie eating contests..

    This state of silent, shadowed war, of secret poisons and sleeping men strangled in their beds, of the sudden arrow and the artful dagger, has no end that I can see. No possibility for peace.

    Hail Sithis

  15. #35

    blakkrskyrr

    Member172 Posts
    Garlyn wrote on February 4, 2013

    I know I’m going to be shot for this, but…

    Guild Wars 2 had one of the best storage systems ever. :[

    why would you get shot for that?  it was good.  why wouldn't it be?

    Our erected wit maketh us know what perfection is, but our infected will keepeth us from reaching into it

    - John Milton, Paradise Lost.

  16. #36

    Brady4444

    Member564 Posts

    The Elder Scrolls has always used weight for storage of items on the character's person.  But you could put something down anywhere.

    But if you put your loot down near an npc's stuff and accidentally pick up their stuff expect all the town to come try to kill you.  I remember playing Morrowind and running from a mob hoping I found a guard to turn myself in because I didnt want to kill all of them. lol

    “It is better to aim at perfection and miss it than to aim at imperfection and hit it.”-Thomas J. Watson Sr., the first president of IBM

  17. #37

    Brady4444

    Member564 Posts

    As long as there is a strong economy it will be no problem to deal with excess items.  Simply convert excess items into currency (trading, vendoring, crafting then selling).

    This is what I will always do in mmo's.  Then when I need something I will have the currency to get it.

    That said, the first time to level max is hard in that I wont know what will be valuable.  By the time I get to level max I'll have figured a lot of it out and things kind of fall into place.

    In my opinion, anything that has to do with item capacity, weight capacity, and crafting will always have something to do with in game economy.

    “It is better to aim at perfection and miss it than to aim at imperfection and hit it.”-Thomas J. Watson Sr., the first president of IBM

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